Recent Updates

  • National Survey of Franchisee Employees Finds Overwhelming Job Satisfaction

    **To RSVP for a 10:30 am press call on 1/10 with the lead survey researcher, email [email protected]** Andy Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants (Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr), has been nominated by President-elect Donald Trump for Secretary of Labor, and his … Continue reading

  • Democrats, not Republicans, Killed $15 in Cleveland

    Earlier this year, the SEIU attempted to ram through a proposal in Cleveland to raise that city’s minimum wage by 85 percent to $15. The Cleveland City Council, consisting of 16 Democrats and 1 Green Party member, overwhelmingly rejected the idea, and … Continue reading

  • As The Ball Drops, The Minimum Wage Rises In 42 States and Municipalities

      With January 1, 2017 around the corner, 42 states and municipalities are poised to ring in the New Year with extreme minimum wage increases.  Nineteen states are raising their starter wages on New Year’s Day and some of the … Continue reading

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About the Minimum Wage

The minimum wage is the minimum hourly wage an employer can pay an employee for work. Currently, the federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour (part of the Fair Labor Standards Act) and some states and cities have raised their minimum wage even higher than that. California and Massachusetts currently have the highest state minimum wages in the country at $10 per hour, and Emeryville, CA, currently has the highest city minimum wage at $14.82 an hour.

Employees that earn the minimum wage tend to be young, and work in businesses that keep a few cents of each sales dollar after expenses. When the minimum wage goes up, these employers are forced to either pass costs on to consumers in the form of higher prices, or cut costs elsewhere–leading to less full-service and more customer self-service. As a result, fewer hours and jobs are available for less-skilled and less-experienced employees.

Minimum wage increases do not help reduce poverty. Award winning research looked at states that raised their minimum wage between 2003 and 2007 and found no evidence to suggest these higher minimum wages reduced poverty rates. While the few employees who earn a wage increase might benefit from a wage hike, those that lose their job are noticeably worse off.

Employees who start at the minimum wage aren’t stuck there. Research found that the majority of employees who start at the minimum wage, move to a higher wage in their first year on the job.